Luis B. Eyzaguirre Lecture Series

Luis Eyzaguirre

1926-1999

The Center for Latin American & Caribbean Studies (now El Instituto: Institute of Latina/o, Caribbean and Latin American Studies) and the Department of Modern and Classical Languages at UConn created the Luis B. Eyzaguirre Lecture to honor the memory of Professor Luis Eyzaguirre, who taught Latin American literature and Spanish at UConn for 32 years. The purpose of the lecture is to provide students at UConn and the larger community of scholars an opportunity to experience the excitement and humanism of Latin America and the Caribbean’s literature and culture. The Eyzaguirre Lecture series allows the University community to know the human side of Latin American and Caribbean Studies by bringing distinguished literary and cultural figures to the Center to share ideas and discourse.

 

2012

Sergio Chejfec

“Foreign Heroes and Donkeys on Strike: Transnational Medical Aid and the Politics of Resentment in Haiti”

A Pierre Minn, Medical Anthropologist, Humanitarian Relief Worker, and an Argentine novelist.

 

2011

Aníbal González-Pérez

“Prophetic Discourse and the Naturalist Novel in Spanish America: Federico Gamboa’s Santa (1903) and Manuel Zeno Gandia’s Redentores (1925)”

Professor of Spanish at Yale University

 

2010

Jenn Andermann

Department of Iberian and Latin American Studies, University of London

 

2009

Coco Fusco

“Becoming Post-Cuban”

New York based interdisciplinary artist, writer and Chair of the Fine Art Department at Parson/The New School Design

 

2008

Mayra Santo Febres

“Invisible Traces: Race in Puerto Rican Literary Discourses”

Novelist, poet, essayist, radio and television personality, and a professor in the Humanities Division of the University of Puerto Rico, Río Piedras

 

2007

José Quiroga

“Cuban Cocktails”

Professor of Spanish at Emory University

 

2006

Doris Sommer

“Art and Accountability”

Professor of Spanish at Harvard University

 

2005

Maria Clemencia Rámirez

“Citizenship Construction in the Context of the International War Against Drugs and Terrorism”

Director at the Colombian Institute of Anthropology and History

 

2004

Maria G. Nouzeilles

“Bone Wars in Patagonia: Dinosaurs, Lost Wars, and the Leviathan”

Professor of Spanish at Princeton University

 

2002

John Dwyer

“Is There Something Special About the U.S.-Latin American Relationship?”

Coordinator of International Information Programs at the U.S. Department of State, former Assistant Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies for Spanish at Yale University

 

2001

Manuel Durán

“Latin American Writers I have Known: Jorge Luis Borges, Pablo Neruda, Juan Rulfo, and Octavio Paz”

Professor Emeritus from the Department of Spanish and Portuguese at Yale University